kia car battery

When is it Time to Buy a New Kia Car Battery?

Can't fix your car problem on your own? Ask a live mechanic!

You get up and realize in horror that your alarm to wake you up for work didn’t go off this morning.

The race is on to get ready and cram a piece of toast in your mouth so you don’t starve to death before lunch, you run out to your Kia and go to crank it only for it to do nothing.

Here are a few tips on how to know when it’s time to trade out your Kia car battery, to ensure you’re not late to your next big business meeting.

Things That Cause Your Car Battery to Fail

There are several factors that could cause your Kia car battery to fail. Here are just a few to start with.

Chemical reactions are a big factor in causing your battery to die. There’s not really any stopping this and, you will have to change your battery at the earliest, every three years.

Even though rumors say the cold takes a large toll on your battery life, heat takes an even bigger toll.

Heavy amounts of heat cause the liquid inside the battery to evaporate, not to mention large amounts of internal damage.

It is recommended for those who live in hotter areas to have their batteries checked after 2 years and then every year after that.

The heat weakens the battery so much in fact, that when the colder months hit, it causes the battery to need a stronger electric current to turn over the now, cold engine.

Leaving the car parked for long periods of a time can also cause you to need a recharge before you head back out on the road.

Now that you know what will cause your battery to go bad, here are the signs that it is time for a change.

Signs Your Kia Car Battery Maybe Going Bad

The life of your car battery is easy to monitor. Electronic testers are available at most automotive shops. In reality, your battery should be tested with each oil change.

If you get behind in checking your Kia car battery, it has its way of giving you signs that it’s on its last leg.

  • The check engine light is on- If the light constantly comes on and there is nothing else wrong with the car, chances are it’s the battery
  • The Battery Fluid is low- Low fluid levels occur when the below the energy conductor. If this is the case, it’s time to check your battery
  • The battery is leaking- Batteries tend to leak in their old age. This could result in corrosion of the battery which is very dangerous
  • Slow engine crank- Batteries that are aging have a hard time starting. If your car is sluggish with cranking it may be time to get the battery checked
  • Your battery is over 3 years old- Once your battery reaches this ripe old age, it should become a part of your normal car maintenance. Batteries should last much longer than this with proper care, but there are always freak instances.

If it is time for a new battery and you have your original battery, it is covered under a limited warranty of 36 Days/36,000 miles. You can have the battery replaced in this time frame at no cost to you.

Tips For Changing Your Battery

Changing your battery is one of the easiest DIY auto repair tasks, but here are some tips.

Turn off the vehicle first. That sounds like common sense but it’s a very important step.

Be careful with the battery for they are filled with acid.

Connect the correct wires to the battery terminal.

Don’t dump the battery in the trash. Chances are, that’s illegal in the state you live in. Instead, you can make a little extra cash by selling it to an auto place.

You will need just a few tools to start out with:

  • New Kia car battery
  • Battery wrench and or pliers
  • Battery terminal puller
  • Rags
  • Safty glasses (Better safe than sorry)
  • Gloves
  • Cleaning fluid

The first thing you want to do is prep your car by putting it in park, putting on the emergency brake, popping the hood, and locating your battery. Remove the black (negative cable) from the battery using your wrench.

Pull at the end of the cable to remove it. If it doesn’t give right away use your terminal puller. Do NOT try to force it with another tool!

Remove your red positive cable.

Remove your battery by using the handle or the base of the battery. Prepare for heaving lifting. Lift with your knees, not your back.

Clean your tray, and parts using your battery cleaner. Old batteries leave corrosion behind at times and you don’t want to expose the new battery to it. Clean everything that has evidence of residue.

Place your new battery in, and connect the cables back. Always attach the red cable back first, then the black.

That’s the basic walkthrough of how to change your car battery. Chances are, doing it yourself will get you out a lot cheaper than paying someone to do it. Only use this method if you are confident you can.

Once you’ve changed your battery, you might not want to do it again for a while. Here are a few ideas on how to lengthen the life of your Kia car battery.

Prolonging The Life Of Your Battery

Check for corrosion every six months and if you find just a little bit, clean it with your cleaning fluid.

Check your fasteners. Having your battery rattle around can cause damage over time.

Test it and then, test it again. Make sure you do this every time you do regular maintenance on your car, such as changing your oil.

For a complete manual on your specific brand of Kia, go here for more details.

Be Late For Work No More

Nobody wants the heart-pounding stress of their car not starting right before their shift.

To avoid this make sure you keep up with regular maintenance on your Kia, and if the problem is your battery than good news, it’s a simple fix if you follow the guide.

Watch for the warning signs and fix the issue before it becomes an issue, and lastly, take steps to prolong the life of the battery of in your Kia. Don’t let your battery make you late again!